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Epic CEO Tim Sweeney Says "Developers Should Be Free To Decide" If They Want NFTs In Their Games

Epic CEO Tim Sweeney has once again reiterated his support for NFTs and blockchain technologies in gaming. After announcing NFT games would be sold on the Epic Games Store last year (and following through with that promise last month), Sweeney has weighed in on Minecraft’s recent NFT ban by repeating sentiments made months ago.

"Developers should be free to decide how to build their games, and you are free to decide whether to play them," wrote Sweeney on Twitter. "I believe stores and operating system makers shouldn’t interfere by forcing their views onto others. We definitely won’t."

Earlier this week, Minecraft banned NFTs on its platform, saying they "create ownership based on scarcity and exclusion, which does not align with Minecraft values of creative inclusion and playing together." Developer Mojang also criticized the speculative nature and investment mentality of NFTs as being antithetical to gaming.

It seems Sweeney disagrees with this notion, instead preferring the free market to decide whether NFTs are something that should exist or not. This is a significant turn from words he uttered last September when he called "the whole field … an intractable mix of scams, interesting decentralized tech foundations, and scams."

Like Minecraft, Steam also banned NFT-based games, but in a seeming attempt to be the opposite of Steam, Sweeney announced the Epic Games Store would "welcome games that make use of blockchain tech." That’s despite the ever-increasing number of outright scams that now seem to outnumber the legitimate blockchain-based games.

Sweeney also offered another interesting opinion that was only somewhat related to NFTs. A user noted that the Epic Games Store banned hateful and discriminatory content, asking how is that any different from banning NFTs, to which Sweeney replied:

"These are all editorial and brand judgments. A store could choose to make no such judgments and host anything that's legal, or choose to draw the line at mainstream acceptable norms as we do, or accept only games that conform to the owner's personal beliefs."

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